Alberta leadership candidate vows to ban employer vaccine mandates

‘Tens of thousands were pressured to take the vaccine on threat of losing their job. This was a human rights violation,’ Danielle Smith said.

HIGH RIVER, Alberta (LifeSiteNews) – Alberta Premier leadership candidate Danielle Smith said employer vaccine mandates enacted in the province were a “human rights violation” and she promised as leader that she would make it illegal for anyone to be fired because of their vaccine status.

“Thousands of Albertans lost their jobs because they wouldn’t agree to be vaccinated. Tens of thousands were pressured to take the vaccine on threat of losing their job. This was a human rights violation,” Smith tweeted yesterday.

Smith said that with “federal booster mandates looming” there will be many companies who will be “pressured into implementing mandates this fall.”

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Secrets: The Jon Rallo story Never-before-heard details from his murder trial and letters from prison. Part 1 of 3

This article was published on Sat., Nov. 22, 2008

They seemed to be the perfect family.

He was a successful city hall manager. She was a beautiful, doting mother. The children were lively and sweet. They lived in a cute little house on a cute little court.

But behind closed doors, the family was far from perfect.

There were secrets.

One summer night in August 1976 — when Pierre Trudeau was prime minister, the brand new CN Tower was the tallest structure in the world, the Montreal Olympics had just ended and parliament voted to abolish the death penalty — Sandra Rallo and her children Jason, 6, and Stephanie, 5, were murdered in their home.

Jon Rallo would be convicted of killing his family.

To this day, he swears he is innocent.

They placed their first child in her cradle.

Sandra. Five days old.

The mother whispered to the father:

“One day a young man is going to take her away from us.”

That man would come. And he would have a secret life. A life of women. And pornography. Bondage. And perhaps sexual assault.

Anger. And violence.

Jon Rallo killed his wife and children 32 years ago.

Now, as he begins life after prison, some of his secrets are still being uncovered. Facts and allegations the jury never heard. His letters from prison.

Some secrets remain. He still does not admit his guilt. He still will not reveal where he put his son’s body.

The Spectator tracked him down in Sudbury, where he is on parole.

It seems he plans to take some secrets to his grave.

Monday, Aug. 16, 1976

Sandra Rallo, 29, is out talking with a music teacher. Arranging piano lessons for herself and her husband Jon. It will be nice to do something new together.

At home, the children are up past bedtime. But rules can bend on a carefree summer night.

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New surrender deadline in Mariupol as West promises Ukraine more arms

Buildings damaged during Ukraine-Russia conflict are shown in the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine on April 19, 2022. ALEXANDER ERMOCHENKO/REUTERS

Russia gave Ukrainian fighters still holding out in Mariupol a fresh ultimatum to surrender on Wednesday as it pushed for a decisive victory in its new eastern offensive, while Western governments pledged more military help to Kyiv.

Thousands of Russian troops backed by artillery and rocket barrages were advancing in what Ukrainian officials have called the Battle of the Donbas.

Russia’s nearly eight-week-long invasion has failed to capture any of Ukraine’s largest cities, forcing Moscow to refocus in and around separatist regions.

The biggest attack on a European state since 1945 has, however, seen nearly 5 million people flee abroad and reduced cities to rubble.

As Russian troops strike in eastern Ukraine, ‘Dnipro is more important than Kyiv’

Russia was hitting the Azovstal steel plant, the main remaining stronghold in Mariupol, with bunker-buster bombs, a Ukrainian presidential adviser said late on Tuesday. Reuters could not verify the details.

“The world watches the murder of children online and remains silent,” adviser Mykhailo Podolyak wrote on Twitter.

After an earlier ultimatum to surrender lapsed and as midnight approached, Russia’s defence ministry said not a single Ukrainian soldier had laid down their weapons and it renewed the proposal. Ukrainian commanders have vowed not to surrender.

“Russia’s armed forces, based purely on humanitarian principles, again propose that the fighters of nationalist battalions and foreign mercenaries cease their military operations from 1400 Moscow time on 20th April and lay down arms,” the Russian Defence Ministry said.

The United States, Canada and Britain said they would send more artillery weaponry.

“We will continue to provide them more ammunition, as we will provide them more military assistance,” White House spokesperson Jen Psaki said, adding new sanctions were being prepared.

U.S. President Joe Biden is expected to announce a new military aid package about the same size as last week’s $800 million one in the coming days, multiple sources told Reuters.

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called for a four-day humanitarian pause in the fighting this coming weekend, when Orthodox Christians celebrate Easter, to allow civilians to escape and humanitarian aid to be delivered.

Russia says it launched what it calls a “special military operation” on Feb. 24 to demilitarize and “de-nazify” Ukraine. Kyiv and its Western allies reject that as a false pretext.

Ukraine said the new assault had resulted in the capture of Kreminna, an administrative centre of 18,000 people in Luhansk, one of the two Donbas provinces.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov confirmed that “another stage of this operation is beginning”.

Driven back by Ukrainian forces in March from an assault on Kyiv in the north, Russia has instead poured troops into the east for the Donbas offensive. It has also made long-distance strikes at other targets including the capital.

The coal- and steel-producing Donbas has been the focal point of Russia’s campaign to destabilize Ukraine since 2014, when the Kremlin used proxies to set up separatist “people’s republics” in parts of Luhansk and Donetsk provinces.

In Mariupol, scene of the war’s heaviest fighting and worst humanitarian catastrophe, about 120 civilians living next to the sprawling Azovstal steel plant left via humanitarian corridors, the Interfax news agency reported on Tuesday, quoting Russian state TV.

Mariupol has been besieged since the war’s early days. Tens of thousands of residents have been trapped with no access to food or water and bodies litter the streets. Ukraine believes more than 20,000 civilians have died there.

“The Russian army will forever inscribe itself in world history as perhaps the most barbaric and inhuman army in the world,” President Volodymyr Zelenskiy said in a video address.

“Deliberately killing civilians, destroying residential quarters and civilian infrastructure, and using all kinds of weapons, including those prohibited by international conventions, is already the brand signature of the Russian army.”

Russia has denied using banned weapons or targeting civilians in its invasion of Ukraine and says, without evidence, that signs of atrocities were staged.

Video released by Ukraine’s Azov battalion purported to show people living in the underground network beneath the steel plant, where they say hundreds of women, children and elderly civilians are sheltering with diminishing supplies.

“We lost our home; we lost our livelihood. We want to live a normal, peaceful life. We want to get out of here,” an unidentified woman says in the video.

“There are lots of children in here – they’re hungry. Get us out of here, we beg you. We’ve already cried out all the tears we have. We can’t cry any more,” she added.

Reuters could not independently verify where or when the video was shot.

Kyiv and Moscow have not held face-to-face talks since March 29. Each side blames the other for their breakdown.

“Obviously, against the backdrop of the Mariupol tragedy, the negotiation process has become even more complicated,” Ukrainian presidential adviser Podolyak told Reuters.

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Canada’s Freezing of Protesters’ Finances Shows How the “War on Cash” Ends

Op-Ed by Robert Fellner

The Canadian government is now freezing the bank accounts and personal assets of those who donated to support the Freedom Convoy, which is an organized political protest of the vaccine mandates. The deputy prime minister announced that they will retain these so-called emergency powers permanently going forward and will also seek to implement additional measures to further restrict the ability of political protesters to raise funds or otherwise use the banking system.

This highlights the need to eliminate the state’s control over money, at least in societies that wish to remain free. As articulated in a fascinating Twitter thread, constitutional rights become utterly meaningless if there are no practical means to exercise them. Free speech rights and the right to assemble are of little use to those who have no ability to access their money. Organizing an assembly requires being able to afford the costs associated with travel. Exercising free speech rights, at least if one wishes to do so effectively, requires at least some funds to ensure that the message reaches a large audience.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau understands this fact, which is why his administration has chosen to freeze the bank accounts of those directly involved in the protest, as well as those who merely donated to help support the protest efforts. When a similarly power-hungry tyrant seeks to do the same here in the United States, the Constitution will be utterly powerless to stop them. Good luck mounting an effective protest to an unjust and tyrannical government without having access to money or the banking system.

It is therefore necessary that Americans start taking the necessary measures to help ensure such tyranny cannot come here. While the ultimate solution will require finding a path to free-market money, the Canadian experience makes clear that simply waiting for that to happen is too risky.

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Science Versus Conscience: Is this a Dilemma?

By Anonymous

NOTE: FEEL FREE TO SHARE, PUBLISH, ETC.

Justin Trudeau came out of hiding, and it seems he almost reveals a smug smile as he resorts to the hackneyed “trust the science” bromide in the following recent video. Both he, and his opposition leader, Candice Bergen, claim to be following the science and yet both advocates completely different policies based on different conclusions. [Double click on hyperlink below]:

https://rumble.com/vufjc5-trudeau-gets-absolutely-roasted-to-his-face-by-conservative-leader.html

The irony here is that puppeteers across the mainstream media, along and various authority figures, have been admonishing the masses to “trust the science” even as they often distort the science (as Ryan Cristian has so often pointed out in his truly important podcasts at: TheLastAmericanVagabond.Com). Note: Ryan’s indefatigable work along with his razor-sharp mind has been exposing many, many distortions of this pandemic scam for a very long time. He deserves the Person of the Year award.

What is particularly disturbing is that while Prime Minister Trudeau was on the lam, his friend and World Economic Forum WEF pal Mark Carney declared in an editorial letter there in Ottawa, that all people who have sent money to the truckers are supporting insurrection and they should be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. See Tucker Carlson video explaining: [double click]:

https://www.foxnews.com/transcript/tucker-carlson-tonight-host-argues-leaders-are-trying-to-intimidate-truckers-for-speaking-out

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JOURNO-TERRORISM: Washington Post and CBC tag-team with criminal cyber hackers to dox and intimidate freedom convoy donors

The corporate-run media is having a heyday doxing the identities of all the donors to the Freedom Convoy in Canada.

It is apparently a crime in the world of libtards to take a stand for one’s right to bodily autonomy, and both The Washington Post and CBC News have decided to punish those who do so by putting their personal information on blast.

According to reports, the Post is now harassing donors who contributed funding to the Canadian truckers who converged on Ottawa in protest of Justin Trudeau’s Wuhan coronavirus (Covid-19) “vaccine” mandate.

“The Washington Post is contacting people whose donation info was leaked and who gave as little as 40 dollars to the truckers to ask them why they did so,” tweeted Saagar Enjeti, a co-host on “Rising with Krystal and Saagar” at The Hill.

Enjeti received this information from a source who emailed him to say that “leaked data” was obtained about the GiveSendGo contributions showing that the Post has been harassing those who participated by asking them what “motivated” them to send money to the truckers.

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